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Three important rules for speaking to the media

When you’re livin’ la vida loca and rolling in moolah, it’s difficult to stay sensible when dealing with the media. Kipp shares three secret weapons for giving an unforgettable interview.

August 29, 2011 5:20 by



Picture from Khaleej Times

If there is one thing this Kipper enjoys reading on The National, it would definitely be the profiles. Generally, The National does an excellent job by selecting subjects who are deserving of media attention. The profiles more often than not promise to be both an inspiring and entertaining read.

One of The National’s most recent article is “When you think you can run a business better, do it“. Barely a few paragraphs into the article, it was evident why this article was given that particular headline. It’s because “Chief Surgeon” Lucy Roberts, owner of graphic design agency Plug Communication, has no bones about talking about her ‘idiot’ former bosses and her approximate net worth and much more.

And so, this inspired us to put together this most excellent guide on “Three important rules for speaking to the media” just in case you find yourself sitting opposite an eager reporter in similar circumstances.

Rule #1: Say exactly what’s on your mind
In this day and age, with social media, blogs and numerous websites it is very difficult to un-say or un-do your actions. So go ahead and say exactly what’s on your mind. People will Google that information anyway. Information much like the fact that Chief Surgeon Lucy sometimes puts on her Plug uniform (which looks like a doctor’s white jacket) because “some days I wear my plug uniform so I can pretend I am in an A & E (Emergency) situation,” as she was quoted in a Khaleej Times article.

When the Chief Surgeon was asked why she set up her own business, she said: “Because I was fed up with working for idiots; I was working for somebody before who had no idea what they were doing and I thought there’s got to be a better way. I took the bold step and set up on my own. I’m now in my fifth year. I don’t remember any employer here being remotely good or inspiring.”

Firstly, don’t flinch about saying you’re the most inspiring and creative boss there is in the country. Say it verbatim, if possible. Or if you’re feeling a little shy do it subtly by generalising the sad state of the whole business community.

Secondly, don’t worry about burning bridges. It doesn’t even matter if your LinkedIn profile still shows your previous employer was an architecture models manufacturer called Super Models UAE. Go for the throat.

Rule #2: It’s all about the money.

So talk about it, in detail.The measure of your success is in your net worth. So don’t blush when talking about money. Just wait for one push like ‘talk to us about your financial journey’ and then start spewing information.

Be generous in details. Journalists just love that. In The National interview, see the Chief Surgeon talk about how she “always had loads of money to spend on Kensington High Street”.

It’s also helpful to talk about earning at least £40,000 (240,000AED+) a year when you were still doing the 9-5s before coming to tax-free Dubai. And don’t forget to mention you are saving up at least 10,000AED for a 150,000AED house project in Sri Lanka.

This way, it’ll be easy for people to Google 150,000AED-worth properties in Sri Lanka and speculate that you may be buying a 4-bedroom beach front house or a 4-bedroom bungalow house with perches of land in Lanka.

Rule #3: Supply an unforgettable photograph of yourself or your company.
A picture is word a thousand words. So give ‘em all the variety of photos you’ve got. Take alternative studio shots that really amplify your personality. Pets, are optional but preferred. What about a photo in a suit with the company logo behind, you ask? Too boring. Check out the above photograph for Chief Surgeon Lucy’s interview in Khaleej Times, which uses the Plug uniform. We can’t confirm it’s really Chief Surgeon Roberts but there’s definitely a resemblance. Like we said, channel you inner Lady Gaga.

If there is one thing this Kipper enjoys reading on The National, it would definitely be the profiles. Generally, The National does an excellent job by selecting subjects who are deserving of media attention. The profiles more often than not promise to be both an inspiring and entertaining read.

When Kipp set our sights on a profile titled “When you think you can run a business better, do it” we were intrigued. Barely a few paragraphs into the article, it was evident why this article was given that particular headline. It’s because “Chief Surgeon” Lucy Roberts, owner of graphic design agency Plug Communication, has no bones about talking about her ‘idiot’ former bosses and her approximate net worth and much more.

And so, with the assistance of this lovely article, Kipp has decided to put together this most excellent guide on “Three important rules for speaking to the media” just in case you find yourself sitting opposite an eager reporter in similar circumstances.

Rule #1: Say exactly what’s on your mind

In this day and age, with social media, blogs and numerous websites it is very difficult to un-say or un-do your actions. So go ahead and say exactly what’s on your mind. People will Google that information anyway. Information like the fact that Chief Surgeon Lucy sometimes to put on her Plug uniform (in the form of a doctor’s white jacket) because “some days I wear my plug uniform so I can pretend I am in an A & E (Emergency) situation,” as she was quoted a Khaleej Times article.

In addition, Chief Surgeon Lucy was asked why she chose to set up her own business, she said: “Because I was fed up with working for idiots; I was working for somebody before who had no idea what they were doing and I thought there’s got to be a better way. I took the bold step and set up on my own. I’m now in my fifth year. I don’t remember any employer here being remotely good or inspiring.”

Firstly, don’t flinch about saying you’re the most inspiring and creative boss there is in the country. Say it verbatim, if possible. Or if you’re feeling a little shy do it subtly by generalising the whole business community.

Secondly, don’t worry about burning bridges. It doesn’t even matter if your LinkedIn profile still shows your previous employer was an architecture models manufacturer called Super Models UAE. Go for the throat.

Rule #2: It’s all about the money. So talk about it, in detail.

The measure of your success is in your net worth. So don’t blush when talking about money. Just wait for one push like ‘talk to us about your financial journey’ and then start spewing information.

Be generous in details. Journalists just love that. In The National interview, see the Chief Surgeon talk about how she “always had loads of money to spend on Kensington High Street”.

It’s also helpful to talk about earning at least £40,000 (240,000AED+) a year when you were still doing the 9-5s before coming to tax-free Dubai. And don’t forget to mention you are saving up at least 10,000AED for a 150,000AED house project in Sri Lanka.

This way, it’ll be easy for people to Google 150,000AED-worth properties in Sri Lanka and speculate that you may be buying a 4-bedroom beach front house or a 4-bedroom bungalow house with perches of land in Lanka.

Rule #3: Supply an unforgettable photograph of yourself or your company.

A picture is word a thousand words. So give ‘em all the variety of photos you’ve got. Take alternative studio shots that really amplify your personality. Pets, are optional but preferred. What about a photo in a suit with the company logo behind, you ask? Too boring. Check out this photograph for Chief Surgeon Lucy’s interview in Khaleej Times, which uses the Plug uniform. We can’t confirm it’s really Chief Surgeon Roberts but there’s definitely a resemblance. Like we said, Channel you inner Lady Gaga.



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