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Fifty shades of blue.

Where are the best places to be born?

What are the best and worst countries in the world to be born in?

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January 14, 2013 12:32 by



Have you ever been asked the question of ‘whether you could choose to be any nationality in the world, which would you choose?’ Well, I haven’t but I’ve heard it being asked. It’s a rather controversial question to mutter and can truly spark some emotional arguments.

Obviously, for many people the strong sense of patriotism kicks in and they naturally become defensive. And who could blame them? Does anyone really want to be told that they should have been born elsewhere, even if it is based on statistical data?

To add fuel to the fire, the Economist Intelligence Unit has released an extensive study ranking all countries of the world against one another. Without boring you with irrelevant figures, here’s a map of the world as we know it. Thanks to the Washington Post, it contains a relatively clear colour coding guideline that ranges from deep blue to dark red.

If you’ve been waiting for a silver lining here it is. The UAE turned out to be one of only countries in the Arab world to have a shade of blue – which even as the most pessimistic of people would agree is quite an achievement.

The study relies on eleven separate variables; when encapsulated include ““which country will provide the best opportunities for a healthy, safe and prosperous life in the years ahead.” Poverty, violence and lack of freedom – according to the study – shape the worst countries in the world to be born in.



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