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Glass half-full—Don’t panic, because we aren’t…

Glass half-full—Don’t panic, because we aren’t…

…seems to be the message that is supposed to inspire confidence in the EU’s financial future; you will excuse Kipp if we remain unfazed.

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August 21, 2011 3:06 by



“Don’t panic, because we aren’t” might as well been the thesis of a report we read about the financial stability future of the EU.

Earlier this morning, we received a brief from INSEAD and Booz & Company on their findings of ‘Revitalising the European Dream: A Corporate View.’ The report found that the 2,000 business leaders who were surveyed were still extremely positive of
the EU’s future (and by connection, the rest of the world).

The majority, 61 percent, said they believed that by 2030, the EU will be a major global power: “Business leaders are convinced that the role of the EU is absolutely essential on such topics as monetary policy, security and budgetary policy. They feel that the influence of the EU will continue to grow moving towards 2030: current difficulties will be overcome, with the role of the EU being pivotal.”

Sure, it’s easy to say 20 years from now things are going to be better. That is all very well, prominent businessmen, but what of the extremely rough half of a year ahead of us? And the even tougher 2012 that looms in the near future?
Oh spin-doctors, in this economic climate, you are going to have to do a lot better.



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1 Comment

  1. Carey Rowland on August 21, 2011 6:38 pm

    Nevertheless, this must be said: The true value and advantage of the Glass half-Full perspective is discovered when put to the test. Persistently constructive attitude shines brightly in the face of dark adversity. In the face of pretend prosperity, it becomes irrelevant.
    The true optimist says the gloomy statistics do not matter. What matters is that we will be able to do, by the grace of God, whatever it takes to dig ourselves out of this hole.
    Life is not about what happens; what’s important is how we respond to what happens.

     

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