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Growing ‘green buildings’ in Dubai

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City’s skyscrapers becoming more sustainable

May 4, 2014 9:43 by



Keeping in line with the Dubai Municipality’s regulations and codes for ‘Green Buildings’, many companies are now supplying sustainable materials to Dubai’s famous skyscrapers. The Smart Skyscrapers Summit 2014, which concluded on Tuesday, April 29, saw many high-profile speakers discussing the importance of building eco-friendly structures.

Dubai residents may not be aware of the fact that many of the city’s buildings are already doing their bit for the environment. All of the companies that attended the summit are already implementing sustainable technologies and materials to existing buildings, as well as upcoming construction projects in Dubai and the greater GCC region.

“Dubai will be home to 149 skyscrapers by the end of 2015,” reveals a statement by Expotrade, the organisers of the event.

“Immense urbanisation has created a need to build tall buildings and with this has come a new set of design and construction challenges to tackling all elements, including weight, wind, fire, energy consumption and accessibility for occupants,” says Charlene Corrin, conference producer at Expotrade Middle East.

More than 300 key role players attended, including senior government officials, developers, engineers, architects and renowned market players.

One of the exhibitors, Foamglass Building, produces roofing materials consisting of recycled glass and uses hydro plants and wind turbines for its production.  Its aim is to produce the lowest carbon footprint in its manufacturing process. According to the company’s regional manager, Manar Nasr, the initial costs of building sustainable high rises were always greater, because special materials are required. However, the running costs are lower. “There is a great long-term benefit, which is both environmental and economic,” he says.

“We fully support the Municipality’s regulations for Green Buildings. It is good to see these kinds of movements, however, we can always do more,” Nasr tells Kippreport.

Green concrete?

Another way of building in an eco-friendly way is to use ‘green concrete’, which is ultimately concrete that is produced in a way that is least harmful to the environment. According to Christopher Stanley, Technical Director of Unibeton Readymix, one such company that does this, about 700kg of carbon dioxide is released into the atmosphere with every tonne of concrete that is produced. In an article published in “The Green Concrete Revolution” he suggests that one way of reducing this is by using cement replacements, but according to Stanley, “it will take a new mindset for them to be widely used in construction in the short-term.”

Other companies that were present specialised in different areas of skyscraper construction, such as energy saving lighting solutions for commercial and residential buildings, energy-efficient elevator technologies and recycled aluminium and steel.

The Dubai Metro is one functional example of where lighting sensors are used to save electricity.

 

e|� r @�� �� act that many of the city’s buildings are already doing their bit for the environment. All of the companies that attended the summit are already implementing sustainable technologies and materials to existing buildings, as well as upcoming construction projects in Dubai and the greater GCC region.

 

“Dubai will be home to 149 skyscrapers by the end of 2015,” reveals a statement by Expotrade, the organisers of the event.

“Immense urbanisation has created a need to build tall buildings and with this has come a new set of design and construction challenges to tackling all elements, including weight, wind, fire, energy consumption and accessibility for occupants,” says Charlene Corrin, conference producer at Expotrade Middle East.

More than 300 key role players attended, including senior government officials, developers, engineers, architects and renowned market players.

One of the exhibitors, Foamglass Building, produces roofing materials consisting of recycled glass and uses hydro plants and wind turbines for its production.  Its aim is to produce the lowest carbon footprint in its manufacturing process. According to the company’s regional manager, Manar Nasr, the initial costs of building sustainable high rises were always greater, because special materials are required. However, the running costs are lower. “There is a great long-term benefit, which is both environmental and economic,” he says.

“We fully support the Municipality’s regulations for Green Buildings. It is good to see these kinds of movements, however, we can always do more,” Nasr tells Kippreport.

Green concrete?

Another way of building in an eco-friendly way is to use ‘green concrete’, which is ultimately concrete that is produced in a way that is least harmful to the environment. According to Christopher Stanley, Technical Director of Unibeton Readymix, one such company that does this, about 700kg of carbon dioxide is released into the atmosphere with every tonne of concrete that is produced. In an article published in “The Green Concrete Revolution” he suggests that one way of reducing this is by using cement replacements, but according to Stanley, “it will take a new mindset for them to be widely used in construction in the short-term.”



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