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Luring skilled workers back to Dubai

Luring skilled workers back to Dubai

Christo Daniels, Marketing Manager of Morgan McKinley UAE, says Dubai may well be back – but more work is needed if it’s to attract top talent again.

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November 29, 2010 5:02 by



“We are back, of course we are back” were the words of Dubai ruler Sheikh Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum. And because Dubai World has restructured, bonds have been sold and the IMF is more upbeat about its future, our ruler is right: Dubai is getting back on track and knows where it is heading.

But how much of the international talent that left during the recession are coming back? And of those looking at pastures new, how many are considering Dubai?

I know that Dubai is making every effort to market the emirate as a place of opportunity. Indeed, Dubai has commissioned an international campaign called “In Dubai Everyday is an Opportunity” – which says it all.

However, we must all shoulder the responsibility to put Dubai back on the map as a serious financial capital. Morgan McKinley Middle East, which was formerly known as iQ selection, has been operating in the region for 13 years and over the last two it has been obvious how many ex-pats have left Dubai, willingly or otherwise. But as Dubai and Abu Dhabi return to growth and resume their twenty- and thirty-year visions, how is the void being plugged? And is it even a problem for foreign firms that have traditionally had a multi-cultural work force? Or are they now enjoying a more streamlined operation?

Morgan McKinley was keen to find some answers so we have been going through a process of qualitative consultation with our clients to understand how much they are relying on recruiting internationally, to what extent this process happens internally or whether they are examining the job market that already exists in the Middle East.

The general consensus of our report is that a company is only as good as its people and so it does not matter where new recruits come from, providing they can excel in their new role. For example, David Clouston is Head of Sales for Kellogg’s and he told us that: “Kellogg’s has recruited both local and international talent, balancing local experience with that of best practice found abroad. This has greatly facilitated the successful growth of our business in the region.”



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1 Comment

  1. mrn on December 9, 2010 3:12 pm

    I am sure at the skilled groups from the Indian subcontinent will not come to Dubai as opportunities are aplenty and salaries have also jumped up with the growth rate. Dubai will have to market itself bit more transparently. With changes occuring rapidly in the spending habits of the common man in dubai and the market getting more realistic to evaluate the salary and the tax free nature of the economy… the penalties fines alone cant keep an economy running.
    Let us wish good for Dubai in the future.

     

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