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Satisfied, much?

Satisfied, much?

How satisfied are you with your life in the UAE? Gallup’s latest survey shows that UAE residents top the satisfaction list in the Arab World. Kipp gives you four reasons why we doubt the findings.

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April 26, 2011 5:14 by



How satisfied are you? If you are struggling to answer that question—we’re not too surprised, because it is a difficult question that has plagued philosophers for centuries. Our friends at Gallup, however, see the issue very differently. In fact they’ve broken down satisfaction measures into three helpful categories: “thriving”, “struggling” and “suffering”. Gallup conducted a worldwide survey on this premise and the results startled good ol’Kipp just a bit.
Turns out, “UAE residents are the most satisfied with their lives in the Arab world, even more than the residents of Britain, France, Germany, Singapore, Hong Kong, Italy among others, (…) [with] around 55 per cent of the UAE residents believe they are “thriving”.” Apparently, the UAE ranked 16th in the entire list: much to Kipp’s surprise?
Why, do we you hear you ask, is Kipp such a cynic? We will give you four reasons why we are surprised more than half of UAE residents are “thriving”
Increased paid parking spots: Just today the local press reported that there will be more than 3,700 new paid parking spots introduced in crowded parts of Abu Dhabi. 2,055 of these new paid spots will be in the area bounded by Airport Road, Defence Road, Karama Street and Delma Street; with 1,674 spaces being in the area between Airport Road, Defence Road, Muroor Road and Delma Street. Unlike parking spots in other parts of the city, these new paid parking regulations will be enforced from 8am to 10pm with the exception of Fridays. Rates will be Dh3 an hour with a four-hour maximum at premium spots, and Dh2 an hour with a 24-hour maximum for standard parking. Excellent. Longer hours than usual and more expensive parking too—Kipp can’t help but bitterly remember previous reports that Emiratis were going to get free parking spots…

Medical insurance premiums likely to rise: According to UAE medical insurance speculators, medical insurance premiums are likely to rise almost as much as 10 to 20 percent this year. The logic being that while health care in the country has risen as much as 30 percent in the last couple of years, insurance premiums haven’t. Makes sense when you argue that way, but Kipp’s scared of what this could mean for our wallets.

Air tickets are likely to increase: Rising crude oil prices are likely to lead to a hike in airfares—meaning Kipp may need to reconsider our annual escape from the UAE. Since April 18, Emirates introduced a fuel surcharge to fares on all sectors in light of the increased oil prices.
Steep maternity prices: “The cost of delivery cases has been increased last year from Dh3,000 to around Dh8,000,” Khalil Sharaf, head of the admission section at Al Wasl, told Gulf News (of course the charges are applicable only for expatriate women). This article from Gulf News also shed light on an unfortunate aspect of maternity care in the UAE: apparently, patients without prior bookings who approach Al Wasl for emergency deliveries are required to pay a fee of Dh5,000 to open a file (just like regular patients who have been with the hospital throughout their pregnancy). Kipp doesn’t understand the logic behind the fee, but the opening charges included, the total bill for the delivery of a child amounts to Dh13,000. And, if you can’t pay it? Tough. Al Wasl does not issue a birth certificate for your child and report you to the police.



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1 Comment

  1. Hippo_crit on April 27, 2011 11:33 am

    i am sorry but out of all reasons that you could have listed… you listed these??!!!??? come on! give it an extra 5 min brainstorming.
    parking: umm did you ever check how expensive it is to park in london or paris, the cities that lie below UAE in satisfaction? UAE have worked hard on their transport system in the last few years. majority of ppl living in paris or london cant afford a car not only because of the parking issues but also because of the crazy tax on buying cars and the amount you have to pay to be ABLE TO DRIVE IT IN THE CITY!
    Medical insurance… im not gonna claim to be an expert in this domain… but other than the amount that you pay for your medical insurance in other countries you also have to pay taxes to cover the medical bill the government incurs whether you are sick or healthy
    the worse was air tickets!!! prices of oil is affecting the whole world not just UAE. im not gonna even get into this one as it was silly of you to include it.
    i could easily find other stuff that affect satisfaction, life availability of cultural events, the layout of the cities, not being able to walk outside in the heat 5 months a year… however all in all i would like to add my vote to the percentage of the satisfied population as there is so much that the country has been able to offer; the only problem is that we take these for granted.

     

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