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Why Kuwait’s political infighting is leaving its economic plans on ice

kUWAIT-GLOBAL

Political infighting between the parliament and government has forced the resignation of two cabinet ministers in less than a month and threatens to draw in more of their cabinet colleagues.

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June 15, 2012 6:25 by



Kuwait has posted fiscal and external surpluses for thirteen years in a row and can absorb the current fall in the oil price despite its large spending plans. Crude traded under $100 a barrel last week.

 

But analysts say this level of comfort means it lacks a sense of urgency to implement the development plan and longer-term reforms.

 

Kuwait is not translating its healthy fiscal position into economic progress, said economist Jassem al-Saadoun, director of the independent al-Shall Centre in Kuwait.          (editing by Ron Askew)

By Sylvia Westall and Ahmed Hagagy



Pages: 1 2 3 4

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1 Comment

  1. dismanirie on June 16, 2012 1:18 pm

    Why is a parliament required if the emir can pick the prime minister who then appoints the cabinet? What a waste of energy and money.

    Either move to a fully democratic system, where the emir remains head of state and the government is elected by the voters, or revert to the old “benevolent dictatorship” model, and convert parliament into a sort of Shoura Council, which can give opinions reflecting electorate concerns but is powerful to influence decisions.

    Kuwait has lost decades of growth and development as a result of its poorly conceived “democracy”.

     

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