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Do you trust your insurer ?

Strongly agree
Agree
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Strongly disagree
Insurance provides peace of mind
Insurance is purchased only when compulsory
Terms and Conditions (small print) are clear and easily accessible
Insurance jargon (language) stands in the way of fully understanding each policy
Insurance companies try their best to uphold the details of the policy without cutting corners
Reducing risk, cutting costs and profits are more important to an insurance company than the customer
Insurance companies in the region are as professional as in other more developed markets
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Do you feel your insurance provider works in your interest?
Have you had a rejected claim that you feel was not justified?
Do you trust your insurance provider?
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Latest News
Dubai’s DEWA says no bonds planned for 2012

Dubai’s DEWA says no bonds planned for 2012

Dubai Electricity and Water Authority (DEWA) has no plans to tap bond markets in 2012 and the state utility will repay a 1.2 billion dirhams ($326.7 million) securitisation maturity this year ahead of time, its top executive said.

March 1, 2012 2:04
 
Saudi’s ACWA “very keen” on Malaysia tycoon’s power assets

Saudi’s ACWA “very keen” on Malaysia tycoon’s power assets

Saudi water and power project developer Acwa Power is "very keen" to buy the power assets being sold by Malaysian tycoon Ananda Krishnan, the company's chief financial officer said on Monday.

February 28, 2012 2:46
 
Thirst for profits—Is trading water ethical or a breach of human rights?

Thirst for profits—Is trading water ethical or a breach of human rights?

As water becomes more scare, the market for water trade becomes more viable. Analysts say it could actually curb food price inflation but who are the losers in this commoditisation?

August 9, 2011 1:22
 
Privatisation, increased imports may solve Saudi water crisis

Privatisation, increased imports may solve Saudi water crisis

Saudi won’t meet its water demands by 2025. Privatisation and increased imports just may be the key solutions, proposes Roger Harrison.

June 1, 2011 3:22